Tag Archives: art selling

(T̶e̶n̶) Thirteen biggest website mistakes artists make – Part V

social_media_share_buttonsAllow me to continue this blog series by describing yet another common artist website mistake many artists make. If you are new to this blog topic please see Part I, Part II, Part III, and Part IV where I discussed the first eight common website mistakes I see many artists make.

I’ll continue where I had left off with the next common website mistake:

9) No social media share buttons

Social media buttons broadly fall into two categories. The first category is the ‘Hey come check out my Facebook page’ one. This type actually takes visitors off your website and brings them to your Facebook page which is not nearly as valuable as the second type; which is what I call the ‘Share’ type. The ‘Share’ type buttons are those social media buttons helping your site’s visitors share your site with their network be it on Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, or Twitter. Done right it helps visitors share a link to your website along with a description of your artwork and possibly an image or two simply by clicking a button. And, it does all that while leaving visitors on your website! You can pre-define what gets shared when setting your social media buttons. It’s a great way to help spread the word!

Looking to gain more insights into how to become a successful artist? Learn what you need to know and be guided through the process, step by step. This is what my Art of profiting from your Art workshop is all about. And the best part is it’s now available online for you to study at your convenience. Click to learn the secrets only successful artists know and see your income grow! This workshop will more than pay for itself in no time!

Have you implemented any website changes that resulted in higher subscriptions and/or increased sales? I would love to hear from you what they were and what were the outcomes!

Copyright 2014, Liron Sissman, ArtistAdvisory.com. All rights reserved.

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Liron Sissman is a professional artist and an MBA. She coaches artists at ArtistAdvisory.com. This article was originally published in her ArtistAdvisory Blog: The Art of profiting from your Art, which is sent to thousands of artists who are elevating their businesses. Start your subscription today and read more articles like this at http://artistadvisory.com

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(T̶e̶n̶) Thirteen biggest website mistakes artists make – Part III

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From my website: Liron.com – Please sign in for future updates!

Let me continue this blog series by pointing out an additional common website mistake many artists make. Are you one of them?

While I’m addressing common artists website mistakes in no particular order I suggest you read this blog series starting with ‘Part I’ and ‘Part II’. These two earlier posts cover five common website mistakes many artists make. I’ll continue where I had left off.

6) No signup form

I coach many artists seeking to take their art business to the next level. But often times, when I first look at their website, I realize an important element is missing. I’m speaking here about an easy, convenient, way to convert visitors into subscribers. It’s called a ‘Signup form’.

People are not likely to email you out of the blue just to ask you to add them to your mailing list, keep them posted of your new artworks, or inform them about your future art events. However, if you facilitate the process and make it easy for them to keep in touch and stay informed, they would like that.

They came to your website either to see your art, or if your keywords are set up to attract your target market, one of the topics I cover in my Art of profiting from your Art workshop to find art like yours. Either way, they have separated themselves from the crowd. Help them connect and stay informed. Give them an easy way to share their name and email address with you. Then nourish the connection.

Your website is not just your business card. It’s also your active 24/7 guestbook (and store front – but that’s for another post and for those downloading my workshop which is now available online for your convenience!). Make your website work for you!

You can easily create and add a signup form using an email service such as Mailchimp, ConstantContact, or iContact. While at it, you may wish to consider making it what’s called a ‘popup signup form’; namely a form that actively solicits visitors to leave their contact information by opening a separate popup window asking them to do so. You can then specify what you will offer them in return.

Have you recently added a signup form that helped make a difference in your subscriber rate? Please share your experience.

Copyright 2014, Liron Sissman, ArtistAdvisory.com. All rights reserved.

Would you like to share this post on your blog or newsletter? If so, all you need to do is include the following with it: Liron Sissman is a professional artist and an MBA. She coaches artists at ArtistAdvisory.com. This post was originally published on her ArtistAdvisory Blog: The Art of profiting from your Art, which is sent to thousands of artists who are elevating their businesses. Start your subscription today and read more posts like this at www.artistadvisory.com

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How to sell through art consultants and why you should

Liron Sissman art in Medical Centers
Artworks by Liron Sissman purchased by St. Joseph Mercy Oakland in Pontiac, MI

Many artists are so focused on obtaining gallery representation that they often overlook other potentially more profitable, and dare I say, easier to work with channels. They probably have good reasons. While galleries exists on many street corners, are visible, some even advertise, and one can just walk into them, few artists know how to find art consultants, let alone how to effectively work with them.

Unlike galleries art consultants are not ‘open to the public’. They don’t display art. And they don’t advertise to the general public. So why should you want to work with them? Well, they offer several distinct advantages. I will start by saying it is because they don’t display art to the public. What does that really mean to you as an artist? It means they don’t work on consignment. When you work with art consultants, you don’t need to spend your hard earned money to frame your art and then ship it somewhere just to see if someone may or may not eventually buy it. Speaking from experience, over the years there were paintings I could have sold if only they were in my studio when certain collectors came over. But the art was off premise, often at a gallery, and the sale that could have happened didn’t. The gallery that held the painting didn’t necessarily sell it on my behalf. Sometimes, months later, the painting came back. This is not meant as a criticism of the gallery system. Galleries typically sell to individuals and individuals generally need to stand in front of an artwork to fall in love with it and hopefully buy it.

Unlike galleries, art consultants typically sell art to organizations: Hotels, medical centers, and companies. Organizations are far more likely than individuals to buy art based on images. This means that artists ship art only after it has sold. For you as an artist, it means you can work with many more art consultants at a time than you could with galleries. It also means you can far more easily work with art consultants long distance, and cross country, than with out of town galleries.

I should also mention that art consultants deal with both originals and giclees. This too is an advantage as it allows you to sell your art over and over again.

Another huge advantage art consultants offer is the likely purchase of multiple artworks at a time. When a new building/center is built the art consultant in charge of the project is often looking to place hundreds of artworks at a time. I am currently speaking with an art consultant looking to buy 1,600 artworks. It is not unusual to sell many artworks at a time. In fact what is unusual is to sell but one.

Unlike shipping art to galleries and source worrying about the inevitable frame damage that occurs over time, shipping art to art consultants is relatively worry-free. This is because art consultants take care of framing on their end. Not only does this save money but it also simplifies shipping.

Art consultants offer a lucrative niche market and a great sales channel. They can easily supplement your other sales channels and they are easy to work with provided you know how to find them and reach out to them. They are NOT easy to find. They spend their time chasing the big projects rather than looking for artists. And, many who call themselves ‘art consultants’ do different things all together.

To save valuable time and effort locating and qualifying art consultants and to quickly learn all you need to know in order to successfully sell your art through them download my eBook: Getting Your Art into Corporate Collections: Why it pays, How to do it, Who to contact In it I share my Rolodex and guide you through the process so that you too know how to:

  •  Sell your art with no consignment
  •  Sell your art nationally
  •  Sell your art in multiples

Download your copy today and expand your sales into these lucrative markets!

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